The African National Congress (ANC) secretary-general Ace Magashule will not be leaving Luthuli House (ANC headquarters) anytime soon, despite a recommendation by the party’s Integrity Commission.

The commission’s report was reportedly leaked just days after Magashule appeared and ruled that he should step aside, while the fraud and corruption case against him is being heard.

Speaking to media in his hometown of Parys, in the Free State on Wednesday, 16 December 2020, Magashule was reluctant to say whether or not he would be stepping aside, saying the ultimate decision was to be made by the National Executive Committee (NEC).

“There is a process of the National Executive Committee of the ANC, which is the second highest decision-making body of the ANC, after the national conference and I think the Integrity Commission was doing its work. Let’s leave it there and leave the matter to the National Executive Committee,” Magashule said.

Magashule faces charges of corruption and fraud in connection to a R255 million asbestos contract awarded in the Free State, when he was still premier.

Magashule slams ‘leaking’ of report

The secretary-general has also condemned the leaking of the report, of which he said certain parts of the recorded engagement should not be made public.

“That is ill-discipline. I don’t know how it was leaked but I’m sure that is left to the organisation to decide and collectively make a decision. I can’t enter that space and muddy the situation”

ANC secretary-general Ace Magashule

In addition to the findings against Magashule, the commission’s report was nothing short of scathing towards the NEC, expressing concern over it’s the growing perception about the decision-making body.

“The IC is increasingly receiving feedback from the general public,including ANC members, that the NEC is not providing decisive leadership and isparalysed in fulfilling its promise of organisational renewal and combating corruption,” the report reads in part.

The commission said it was particularly worried about the negative impact the perceptions have on the organisation as a whole.

“It is now perceived that the NEC cannot implement its decision againstits Secretary General not as a form of protecting him, but because some of the NECmembers are themselves implicated in wrong doing. The highest decision-makingbody between conferences is responsible for the increasing lack of trust by the very people it purports to lead”

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